1015 FOLSOM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CA

RT @StarSlinger: happy to say @BIGFREEDIA Live is added to my SF Show! Gonna be a fuckin party at @1015sf ! Tickets: http://t.co/lHHedF3adb
RT @DotheBay: this one's gonna go off! @djembadjembaa, @Carmadamusic, @ganzmusic, @KRNEmusic +++ at @1015sf. So stacked, less go http://t.c…
RT @WakaFlocka: #SanFrancisco I'm performing at @1015sf on Aug. 27th! Get your tix NOW before it's too late! http://t.co/y0m6Js1ENH http://…
RT @GANZGVNZ: CA and USA I'll be back tomorrow kicking off at @1015sf and dropping my new single 'Cold Fire' on @thehardheaded ❤️ http://t.…
RT @thatgirllaura22: Can I just say that I had the time of my life at @HippieSabotage 😍✌️👯 @1015sf #love #sf #california #myfavorites http:…
Stoked to have @wearefutureclassic breakout duo @carmadamusic making their SF Debut tomorr… http://t.co/YVD96RqYEj http://t.co/1h4P5YaG7s
Danger, we've got @BigFreedia coming back next week... https://t.co/Sy3ZzXSUOa Catch her after #outsidelands on 8/7!
#TBT @ djembadjembaa throwing down at the @beatTeamSupreme showcase. Don't miss the homie back here tmrrw! http://t.co/IdpHcc1PNg
.@KrneMusic never stops. https://t.co/jhlIovDMq0 Very excited to have him reppin' the Bay tomorrow!
  • Jul
    DJ Dials, Redeye, Diamond Supply, Euphonic Conceptions & 1015 Folsom present
    DJEMBA DJEMBA
    GANZ
    CARMADA
    KRNE
    For Djemba Djemba, versatility is king. From bass pow- ered festival bangers to mass-appealing future pop to intelligent headphone music, Djemba’s main focus is to create truly authentic, and refreshingly unexpected music that defies classification. His ever-changing solo work, extensive collaborations, and thoughtful curation has made him something of an Internet legend among fans, tastemakers, and major labels alike. In the last year alone, Djemba’s diverse productions have brought songs with big names such as Diplo, Justin Beiber, The Weeknd,
    Chris Brown, Tiga, Sia, Katy Perry, and Britney Spears; as well as underground heroes such as Obey City, RL Grime, London Future, Trippy Turtle, Hoodboi, and Mr. Carmack. He has also assumed the role of curator helping to promote a new generation of undiscovered artists from the internet and producer crew TeamSupreme. Since his notable Boilerroom performance, Djemba has also earned his keep as a unique DJ who has headlined tours in the US, Canada, and Australia and played festivals such as Electric Daisy Carnival, Snowglobe, and Hard Summer.
  • Aug
    DreamQuest Media, WeNightlife, Ankh Marketing, SocialSF, & 1015 Folsom present
    DJ DADDY KAT
    aka WIZ KHALIFA
    “Being out in front of people and just being ‘The Man’” might sound like a vague and ridiculous dream to have, but for Cameron Thomaz it might be the most appropriate thought to cross any mind. Better known as Wiz Khalifa, the son of two military parents has always had his eye on being a new standard by which cool is measured. Rapping since the third grade and starting to record music at 14 was probably a step in the right direction.
  • Aug
    DJ Dials & 1015 Folsom present a PARTY AFTER OUTSIDE LANDS
    BIG FREEDIA (LIVE)
    STAR SLINGER
    JAI WOLF
    KITTENS
    SHELCO GARCIA & TEENWOLF
    Big Freedia (pronounced “FREE-da”), known as the Queen of Bounce, is at the forefront of the Bounce rap movement (a subgenre of hip-hop born out of New Orleans and known for its call and response style and lightening speed booty-shaking dance). Performing five out of seven nights in any given week with dancers she calls The Divas, Big Freedia’s show is nothing short of dazzling. She tours every city in America from New York to San Francisco and is always a favorite at festivals such as Electric Forest, Hangout Fest, FunFunFun Fest, SXSW, and Bonnaroo, among many others.

    Gay and proud, Big Freedia asserts that her (Freedia is a he but uses the feminine pronoun for her stage persona) sexuality has little to do with her music. "All types of people—gay, straight, rich, poor, black, white come to my shows. People just wanna get out and shake their azzzz and have a good time!”

    Big Freedia has gone from a local New Orleans phenomenon to a national one over the past two years. After appearing in two episodes of HBO series ‘Treme’ [as herself] and in 2010, she released her debut EP on Scion A/V Presents: Big Freedia, produced by NOLA producer BlaqNmilD. The EP featured notables “Excuse” and “Almost Famous; other fan-favorites include “Gin in my System” “Azz Everwhere” and “Y’all Get Back Now.” Adding to her catalog, this year she released “Nah Who Mad” and “Booty Whop,” and she was featured on Spank Rock’s Everything is Boring and Everyone is a Fucking Liar LP, on the track “Nasty.”

    This January, Freedia made her television network debut on Jimmy Kimmel Live! She appeared on “Last Call with Carson Daly,” FADERTV, PITCHFORK TV and has been lauded in press outlets such as The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Fader, RollingStone.com, SPIN, OffBeat, Chicago Tribune, Columbia Spectator, Pheonix New Times, San Francisco Chronicle, LA Times, LA Weekly, among many other media outlets.

    Always pushing artistic boundaries, this year Big Freedia went hi-tech by releasing the Big Freedia Booty Battle Video Game, which Forbes magazine covered, calling it “…everything a great game should be.”

    Raised on Josephine Street in uptown New Orleans, Big Freedia, born Freddie Ross, was raised by his mother, a hairdresser, and stepfather, a truck driver for Coca-Cola. When Freddie was 15, the family moved to a more upscale neighborhood in New Orleans. Freddie—along with his brother Adam and sister Crystal Ross—were immersed in music at home by their mother, who often sang along to her Gladys Knight and Patty LaBelle records around the house. But it was the Baptist church choir where a young Freddie flourished. ”My mother made sure I never missed practice,” recalls Freedia. It’s no wonder that by the time he was 18, Freedia moved from member to director of the choir.

    A product of the hip-hop generation, Freedia was rocking RUN DMC, Salt ‘n Pepa and Adidas Shell Tops as a teenager. One night in 1991 he heard "Where Dey At" by MC T Tucker, (what many believe to be the first recorded Bounce track) and he was transfixed. After starting as a back-up dancer for Katey Red, the original “Sissy Bounce” rapper, Freedia knew Bounce was his calling and eventually broke out on his own.

    Big Freedia is in the studio wrapping up her new ep Queen of Bounce and her first TV series, Queen of Bounce will air this Oct on Fuse TV. Finally, in the works is her DVD: Big Freedia Presents: Twerk Bounce & Pop, featuring real Bounce dance instruction from Big Freedia and some of her best and noted Divas.
  • Aug
    1015 Folsom presents
    GARETH EMERY
    VOTED THE UK'S #1 DJ FOR 5 YEARS RUNNING, GARETH EMERY’S METEORIC RISE TO EDM’S ELITE SHOWS NO SIGNS OF SLOWING. GARETH EMERY’S DEBUT ALBUM NORTHERN LIGHTS STORMED WORLDWIDE CHARTS, TAKING THE #1 SPOT ON US DANCE ITUNES. HIS LAST SINGLE CONCRETE ANGEL WAS VOTED TRACK OF THE YEAR IN NUMEROUS 2012 POLLS CLOCKING OVER 15,000,000 YOUTUBE VIEWS, WHILST HIS OWN LABEL GARUDA HAS SEEN RECORD BREAKING SUCCESS IN THE BEATPORT CHARTS ALONGSIDE GLOBAL SELL-OUT SHOWS AT THE WORLD’S FINEST CLUBS AND FESTIVALS.

    A classically trained musician, Gareth’s career ascent over the past five years has been impressively and deservedly rapid. Producing gripping, club-facing records, whilst also pioneering one of the first and most successful EDM podcasts: The Gareth Emery Podcast which has won countless awards and has over half a million subscribers. His musical style is a fierce blend of house, trance and electro. Favoring musical diversity over stifling genre norms, the Marquee Las Vegas resident is always pushing the boundaries of the scene. His label Garuda is a hot bed of fresh talent , hosting sell-out nights across the world, from Miami Music Week to the UK’s Warehouse Project.
  • Aug
    Dj Dials, Euphonic Conceptions, & 1015 Folsom Present
    SHLOHMO (dj set)
    x TORY LANEZ (live)
    Shlohmo is the creation of Henry Laufer, LA-native and visual artist turned selftaught musician. As a founding member of the WEDIDIT collective (RL Grime, Groundislava, D33j, Purple, 2kwtvr, Juj, Nick Melons), Henry’s early work placed him at the forefront of a new wave of rising talent amongst west coast producers. With an effortless grasp on sound design, Laufer combines deceptively simple and emotive melodies, subtle bass drops and swinging slow motion drums. Receiving support from Pitchfork, BBC Radio, the New York Times, NPR, Resident Advisor and many others, Shlohmo leads the way in a new generation of promising young producers with his unique blend of dark and sensual R&B tropes.
  • Aug
    1015 Folsom presents
    WAKA FLOCKA FLAME - LIVE
    + SPECIAL GUESTS
    I never in my life wanted to rap. Let me quote that sh*t now.—Waka Flocka Flame on his 2009 debut mixtape, Salute Me or Shoot Me, Vol. 1

    Waka Flocka Flame didn’t want to be a rapper when he grew up. He didn’t want to write hit songs, perform in front of thousands of people at packed clubs or hear his songs played on radio stations across the country. But more than a year after bursting onto the scene with his debut single, “O Let’s Do It,” the Atlanta rapper has managed to make more of an impact on the music industry than most rappers who have spent their entire lives trying to do it. And thanks to an influential cosign from fellow ATLien Gucci Mane, and a string of chart-topping singles, including the remix to “O Let’s Do It,” featuring Rick Ross and Diddy, and his latest hit, “Hard In Da Paint,” it doesn’t look like Waka Flocka is ready to quit rapping anytime soon.

    “I never dreamed I would be doing what I’m doing today,” says Waka, who earned his unique nickname from a cousin when he was younger while they were watching an episode of Jim Henson’s classic puppet show, The Muppet Show (he later added the “Flocka Flame” to the end of it at the suggestion of Gucci Mane). “I never imagined I’d become a rapper, let alone a successful rapper.”

    Born Juaquin Malphurs in Queens, N.Y., Waka Flocka certainly had all the connections to forge into music at a young age. He grew up around the corner from Murda Inc. recording artist Ja Rule, lived near LL Cool J’s grandmother and even had a cousin who used to hang around the popular group Lost Boyz in the mid-1990s. But when his mother Debra Mizay—now the CEO of artist management group Mizay Entertainment—relocated the family to Riverdale, Georgia when Waka was 11, he shied away from music and instead focused on his love for basketball. And after his youngest brother died in automobile accident when Waka was just 14, he moved even further away from it, instead opting to spend his time running the streets of Atlanta with his friends.

    “That whole period of my life really messed with my head,” says Waka. “I ain’t even gonna lie—it killed me as a man. But it also made me stronger as a man in the future.”

    At 18, Waka looked on as his mother began managing the career of Gucci Mane, who had established himself as a force to be reckoned with in Atlanta at the time by performing relentlessly throughout the South. Within two years, Waka began messing around with music himself alongside local producer Tay Beatz, who helped him shape his rambunctious personality on the microphone. “I was going through so much at the time,” says Waka. “I had so much stress and so many issues. I couldn’t release my emotions physically, so releasing them verbally was the only option I had.”

    The result was Waka’s 2008 mixtape, Salute Me or Shoot Me, Vol. 1, featuring the trap anthem, “O Let’s Do It,” a song that caught on instantaneously in the A and quickly spread to other parts of the country. It allowed Waka to take his show on the road and also earned him a coveted slot in Gucci Mane’s 1017 Brick Squad clique. “Gucci and them were kind of shocked,” says Waka, “because nobody really knew I was rapping and then, all of a sudden, I had the biggest song in the South.”

    But all the sudden success also took its toll on Waka. In January 2010, he was shot several times at a car wash in Atlanta during an alleged robbery attempt. The following month, legendary East Coast artist Method Man was doing an interview on satellite radio and spoke out against Waka, criticizing the lack of lyricism involved in crafting his style of music. He also endured a short rift in his relationship with Gucci Mane recently after the rapper parted ways with his mother’s management company in May. The incidents earned Waka a reputation as one of the most controversial artists in the industry—a reputation that he doesn’t feel he deserves.

    “People have definitely gotten the wrong impression of me so far,” says Waka. “I don’t know why they think I’m so controversial. I guess people just don’t know the real me yet. It’s up to me to change their minds.”

    He’s spent the better part of 2010 doing exactly that. Earlier this summer, he released “Hard In Da Paint,” a catchy Lex Luger-produced track that inspired a slew of freestyles by other artists. He also put the finishing touches on his debut album, Flockaveli—the first released through So Icey/Asylum/Warner Bros. Records. Featuring the rowdy intro, “Bustin’ At ’Em,” the strip club anthem, “No Hands,” featuring Roscoe Dash and Wale, and the brutally-honest closing track, “Fuck This Industry,” it promises to be one of the most energetic debut albums of the year.

    By naming it Flockaveli, Waka—who calls 2Pac his favorite rapper of all-time—is also doing more than just being controversial for the sake of being controversial. “2Pac introduced me to a guy named Machiavelli,” says Waka. “His back was always to the wall and people threw sticks and stones at him and he had to keeping blocking them. When I recorded this album, that’s how I felt.”

    And if anyone doesn’t like it? “I don’t care,” says Waka. “I’m just going to keep on making my music.”

    For a guy who claims he never wanted to be a rapper, he’s certainly come around to the idea.