1015 FOLSOM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CA

ICYMI: @MadDecent Block Party Afterparty - Sept 11th Tickets WILL NOT last long. Get your… http://t.co/mK1sqtgKbI http://t.co/QEcgunkEqI
Headphones on, volume to 11, lose your sh*t - https://t.co/PfgObARDPa @KeysNKrates are here TOMORROW!
RT @DotheBay: no question about it, @keysnkrates are gonna crush tomorrow night at @1015sf http://t.co/HKVqQmD2fN
Here comes the GIFs to get u hyped for tonight with @WakaFlocka #squad http://t.co/xIaOap8hyh
.@Spzrkt + @thisjlouis = 💯 @Soulection feels https://t.co/P8W1cb8ZXr Bet here next Friday!
  • Aug
    1015 Folsom presents
    WAKA FLOCKA FLAME - LIVE
    + SPECIAL GUESTS
    I never in my life wanted to rap. Let me quote that sh*t now.—Waka Flocka Flame on his 2009 debut mixtape, Salute Me or Shoot Me, Vol. 1

    Waka Flocka Flame didn’t want to be a rapper when he grew up. He didn’t want to write hit songs, perform in front of thousands of people at packed clubs or hear his songs played on radio stations across the country. But more than a year after bursting onto the scene with his debut single, “O Let’s Do It,” the Atlanta rapper has managed to make more of an impact on the music industry than most rappers who have spent their entire lives trying to do it. And thanks to an influential cosign from fellow ATLien Gucci Mane, and a string of chart-topping singles, including the remix to “O Let’s Do It,” featuring Rick Ross and Diddy, and his latest hit, “Hard In Da Paint,” it doesn’t look like Waka Flocka is ready to quit rapping anytime soon.

    “I never dreamed I would be doing what I’m doing today,” says Waka, who earned his unique nickname from a cousin when he was younger while they were watching an episode of Jim Henson’s classic puppet show, The Muppet Show (he later added the “Flocka Flame” to the end of it at the suggestion of Gucci Mane). “I never imagined I’d become a rapper, let alone a successful rapper.”

    Born Juaquin Malphurs in Queens, N.Y., Waka Flocka certainly had all the connections to forge into music at a young age. He grew up around the corner from Murda Inc. recording artist Ja Rule, lived near LL Cool J’s grandmother and even had a cousin who used to hang around the popular group Lost Boyz in the mid-1990s. But when his mother Debra Mizay—now the CEO of artist management group Mizay Entertainment—relocated the family to Riverdale, Georgia when Waka was 11, he shied away from music and instead focused on his love for basketball. And after his youngest brother died in automobile accident when Waka was just 14, he moved even further away from it, instead opting to spend his time running the streets of Atlanta with his friends.

    “That whole period of my life really messed with my head,” says Waka. “I ain’t even gonna lie—it killed me as a man. But it also made me stronger as a man in the future.”

    At 18, Waka looked on as his mother began managing the career of Gucci Mane, who had established himself as a force to be reckoned with in Atlanta at the time by performing relentlessly throughout the South. Within two years, Waka began messing around with music himself alongside local producer Tay Beatz, who helped him shape his rambunctious personality on the microphone. “I was going through so much at the time,” says Waka. “I had so much stress and so many issues. I couldn’t release my emotions physically, so releasing them verbally was the only option I had.”

    The result was Waka’s 2008 mixtape, Salute Me or Shoot Me, Vol. 1, featuring the trap anthem, “O Let’s Do It,” a song that caught on instantaneously in the A and quickly spread to other parts of the country. It allowed Waka to take his show on the road and also earned him a coveted slot in Gucci Mane’s 1017 Brick Squad clique. “Gucci and them were kind of shocked,” says Waka, “because nobody really knew I was rapping and then, all of a sudden, I had the biggest song in the South.”

    But all the sudden success also took its toll on Waka. In January 2010, he was shot several times at a car wash in Atlanta during an alleged robbery attempt. The following month, legendary East Coast artist Method Man was doing an interview on satellite radio and spoke out against Waka, criticizing the lack of lyricism involved in crafting his style of music. He also endured a short rift in his relationship with Gucci Mane recently after the rapper parted ways with his mother’s management company in May. The incidents earned Waka a reputation as one of the most controversial artists in the industry—a reputation that he doesn’t feel he deserves.

    “People have definitely gotten the wrong impression of me so far,” says Waka. “I don’t know why they think I’m so controversial. I guess people just don’t know the real me yet. It’s up to me to change their minds.”

    He’s spent the better part of 2010 doing exactly that. Earlier this summer, he released “Hard In Da Paint,” a catchy Lex Luger-produced track that inspired a slew of freestyles by other artists. He also put the finishing touches on his debut album, Flockaveli—the first released through So Icey/Asylum/Warner Bros. Records. Featuring the rowdy intro, “Bustin’ At ’Em,” the strip club anthem, “No Hands,” featuring Roscoe Dash and Wale, and the brutally-honest closing track, “Fuck This Industry,” it promises to be one of the most energetic debut albums of the year.

    By naming it Flockaveli, Waka—who calls 2Pac his favorite rapper of all-time—is also doing more than just being controversial for the sake of being controversial. “2Pac introduced me to a guy named Machiavelli,” says Waka. “His back was always to the wall and people threw sticks and stones at him and he had to keeping blocking them. When I recorded this album, that’s how I felt.”

    And if anyone doesn’t like it? “I don’t care,” says Waka. “I’m just going to keep on making my music.”

    For a guy who claims he never wanted to be a rapper, he’s certainly come around to the idea.
  • Aug
    DJ Dials, Eye Heart SF, & 1015 Folsom present
    KEYS N KRATES live
    Keys N Krates formed as the brainchild of drummer Adam Tune, synth/keyboard aficionado David Matisse and internationally award-winning turntablist Jr. Flo. The Toronto trio came together in 2008 with the desire to bring their blend of live electronic instrumentation to the stage.

    They've often been referred to as the worlds only "trap band," a title they reluctantly accept. Tune says it best: "At the end of the day, people are going to call us whatever they want. We are referencing everything from classic house music to Timbaland in our beats, but I think the trap references tap into what the current sound is, and we are okay with that."

    Having toured their unique blend of hip hop and bass music extensively across North America, Keys N Krates put out a slew of original music in 2013. Their most recent body of work, titled SOLOW EP, was released via Steve Aoki's Dim Mak Records in September 2013.

    The EP features KNK's banger "Treat Me Right," which launched with the support of figureheads like Diplo, Major Lazer, Flosstradamus, and TNGHT. It went to number one on Hype Machine, continues to chart on the Beatport Hip Hop Chart, and remains a fixture in DJ sets and car stereos across the globe.

    Premiered by Annie Mac on BBC Radio1, their second single off SOLOW EP, "Dum Dee Dum," experienced a similar kind of success on the charts and has solidified the trio as creators of anthemic party music with a quickly growing fan base.

    KNK has since explored their love for rap music by creating a remix of "Dum Dee Dum." Featuring G.O.O.D. Music's Cyhi The Prynce, King Louie, and Tree, the track has received glowing reviews from the likes of Fader Magazine, Vice Mag, and NahRight. "We had so much fun doing that rap remix," says Flo. "We can't wait to work with more rappers and vocalists in general."

    Perhaps what truly separates Keys N Krates from the mass of Electronic and Hip Hop producers out there is the unique show they create by performing their bassy beats as a band, completely live. When you go to a KNK show, you will see their music and the music of others morphed and turned on it's head using only drums, keys, turntables and live sampling. This unique style creates not only a crazy dance party, but an experience and vibe like no other.

    As a result, KNK have found themselves playing some of the world's largest Festivals, including Lollapalooza, Electric Zoo, Ultra Music Festival, Osheaga, and Sonar Festival (to name a few.) As Matisse says, "Our favourite thing is playing live and bringing people into our world."
  • Sep
    Luther B 415, We Nightlife, Ankh Marketing, & 1015 Folsom present
    MASTER P
    performing LIVE
    Percy Miller also known as “Master P” was born on April 29, 1970 in New Orleans, LA. Although he was raised in the poverty of Calliope Housing Projects, he was motivated and determined to reach his goals and dreams, which led him to become a successful entrepreneur. As a student-athlete at the University of Houston, he studied Business Communications and later relocated to Richmond, CA where he opened his first small business, a record store he called No Limit Records. Within a few years, he turned it into a record label, which flourished into one of the biggest music brands in the industry. As a music mogul, he ventured off into the business of television, film, acting, producing, sports, clothing, and real estate.

    However, none of his accomplishments and success would compare with his philanthropy and passion for helping the next generation where he created Let The Kids Grow Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to help develop youth and their families through out-of school time and family strengthening programs in their communities. Founder Percy Miller discovered a way to help keep inner city youth off the streets away from drugs and gang violence by providing a safe haven for kids to express themselves with positive energy through film, dance and music. The foundation also offers an after-school program for at-risk youth where the kids have access to academic support and guidance counseling. Let The Kids Grow program give youth and their families the tools that they need to become positive, confident, contributing members of our community.
  • Sep
    DJ Dials, HGMNY, & 1015 Folsom present
    SOULECTION: SOUND OF TOMORROW
    SPZRKT // SPECIAL GUEST // STARRO
    SOSUPERSAM // JOE KAY
    ANDRE POWER // THE WHOOLIGAN
    Soulection affiliate and frequent Sango collaborator SPZRKT, aka Spazzy Rocket, is a 25 year old rapper turned vocalist. In just three years, the San Antonio based singer-songwriter reached a remarkable level of success from a series of popular releases and collaborations.

    He recently released a collaborative EP with Sango titled, “Hours Spent Loving You.” The seven track EP was a summation of how relationships are viewed both earthly and heavenly. This project hit home for the people who have deeply supported SPZRKT & Sango. So in return, they felt it was right by giving thanks, and allowing these people to understand their stories in and out.

    Friday September 4th will be his first performance in San Francisco. We’ve heard through the grapevine that his live performances are a contagious combination of his upbeat energy and gospel like vocals that will take control of the crowd.
  • Sep
    DJ Dials, Mad Decent, & 1015 Folsom present
    MAD DECENT BLOCK PARTY AFTERPARTY
    ft MAD DECENT ALL STARS
    Mad Decent is the name of the Los Angeles-based record label spearheaded by Wesley Pentz, better known as Diplo, the 3x Grammy-nominated producer and world renowned DJ. As an influential label that has been home to artists like Major Lazer, Baauer, Rusko, Dillon Francis, RiFF RAFF, Crookers, Bonde Do Role (to name a few), Mad Decent aims to bring new genres and cultures to light in the ever diversifying music community. Aside from the music released, Mad Decent is also known for its annual Block Parties, a series of outdoor dance party/concerts in select cities across the United States and Canada.
  • Sep
    Euphonic Conceptions, DJ Dials, & 1015 Folsom present RE:CREATION
    KOAN SOUND
    DOJA CAT
    LAPALUX
    KOAN: A puzzling, often paradoxical statement or story, used in Zen Buddhism as an aid to meditation and a means of gaining spiritual awakening.

    What is buddha?
    Three pounds of flax.